Posts Tagged ‘Student-Teacher Relationship’

August 16th, 1970 (Evening talk)

Sunday, August 16th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Sunday Evening, August 16, 1970 

San Francisco

Lecture A

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-08-16A

 

[The first part of the lecture was not recorded.]

 

… restore the Buddhist teaching in its original way.

 

So that you don’t know anything about Buddhism is very good [laughs].  We have no trouble to—to make you piece by piece [laughs].

 

So here, you know, and—American people has very open-minded—is very open-minded.  So for you, it is accept the teaching, you know, without trouble.  That is my feeling.

 

And one more point is because your mind is open, and we have not much prejudice, you know, you know—you see things clearly.  And if the teaching is not pure enough, and—then you will not accept it.  But there is—of course there is some danger.  The danger is, you know, you will easily, you know, [get] caught by some wrong teaching too.  You—you—someone said, you know, American people are like a sheep [laughs].  There is that—that danger.  And if you meet with some ambitious person, you will be easily, you know, involved in wrong activity.  That is one danger.  But for sincere teacher, American people is maybe the best friend.

(more…)

July 26th, 1970

Sunday, July 26th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

MUDRĀ PRACTICE AND HOW TO ACCEPT INSTRUCTIONS FROM VARIOUS TEACHERS

Sunday Morning, July 26, 1970

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-26 

 

This morning, I want to talk about our practice, as usual [laughs],  as—especially when we have various teachers.  So far we had Tatsugami-rōshi[1] and Yoshida-rōshi.[2]  And you will be—you will have—your practice must be confused a little bit [laughs], this way or that way [laughs].  But actually for you there is only one practice.  There is no need to be confused when you have right understanding of our practice of Dōgen-zenji.  But I don’t say Dōgen-zenji’s way, this way, or that way.

 

For advanced students, what I want to talk about will be easily understood.  You know, for an instance, when you, you know—about mudrā you have in your zazen.  Keizan-zenji,[3] you know, says:  “Put your mind on your mudrā, or in your palm.”  And some teacher—Yoshida-rōshi says—say:  “Put your thumb on your middle finger, like—over your middle finger.”  Some other teacher says, you know,” put your thumb—have a vertical line by [between] your pointing finger and thumb, like this [presumably gestures].

 

Recently what—I notice that some—some of you [laughs] [were] doing this too much this way.  Someone’s finger—finger—thumb is not right over middle finger, you know.  Maybe [laughs] like this.  Going the extreme, you know, like this.  That is not what Yoshida-rōshi said.

This is too much.

(more…)

July 13th, 1970

Monday, July 13th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi participating in a ceremonial procession (in Japan)

Suzuki-roshi participating in a ceremonial procession (in Japan)

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 5:  THE THIRD MORNING EKŌ

Monday, July 13, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-13

[fixed audio uploaded on 9/25/2013]

 

[This is the fifth in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

 

The Third Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka sōdō fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Sandōkai o fujusu, atsumuru tokoro no shukun wa,

Bibashi-butsu-daioshō,

Shiki-butsu-daioshō,

Bishafu-butsu-daioshō,

Kuruson-butsu-daioshō,

Kunagonmuni-butsu-daioshō,

Kashō-butsu-daioshō,

Shakamuni-butsu-daioshō,

Makakashō-daioshō

Ananda-daioshō,

Shōnawashu-daioshō,

Ubakikuta-daioshō,

Daitaka-daioshō,

Mishaka-daioshō,

Vashumitsu-daioshō,

(more…)