Posts Tagged ‘Dhyanas’

November 1, 1965, 2nd Talk

Monday, November 1st, 1965
SR0115

Suzuki-roshi - Zazen in the old Tassajara zendo

ONE-DAY EVENING SESSHIN LECTURE

Shunryū Suzuki

November 1965 (Wind Bell, Jan.–Feb. 1966)

Almost all of you have not practiced Zen so long, but I think you have made great progress. This result is more than we expected. As I always say, for the beginner the most important point is posture. While you are working hard on your posture you will study many things besides your physical training. Physical training always follows mental training, even though you do not try to train your mentality. To put your mind in the right way is one interpretation of Zen. Or to resume your right mind is called Zen. Samapati means to resort to the right state of mind. Another interpretation is to put our mind in the right place. Physical training will result from the right orientation of your mind. If you are determined to overcome your pain your mind will follow your pain. But if your determination is not strong enough your mind will be in agitation. Zen is not struggling. When you practice Zen your mind should be calm-even though you fight with your pain your mind should always be calm. It means your mind follows your pain like water, as water always follows the lower place. If your determination is strong enough, your mind becomes calm: following your physical condition and finding out many things. As long as you are struggling with your physical condition your mind will not find anything; your mind is shut; your mind is occupied so it will not be anything. When your mind is calm enough, even in your pain, you will find out many things. When your mind is in this state it is called a “well-oriented” mind. To put your mind in the right way is Zen. When your mind is calm you will find various tastes in … [missing words]

(more…)

November 1 1965

Monday, November 1st, 1965

ONE-DAY SESSHIN LECTURES

Shunryū Suzuki

November 1965 (Wind Bell, Jan.–Feb. 1966)

Early Afternoon Lecture:

Buddhism is very philosophical, and sometimes intellectual and logical. It is necessary to be logical and philosophical to believe in the teaching completely. If it is not logical and philosophical, you cannot believe in it. Our teaching should not be doubtful. Although intellectual and philosophical understanding of the teaching is not enough, it should be at least be logical and philosophical.

Sometimes a student of Buddhism will become proud of the lofty, profound philosophical teaching. This is wrong. The philosophy is for the believer himself, not for others. Because it is difficult for us to believe in the teaching, we should enter it from an intellectual approach. However, there is no need to be proud of the profundity of it. It is just for the student, not for others. If it is possible to believe in Buddha’s teaching without philosophical understanding it may be all the better. For most of us it is quite difficult to believe in it without intellectual understanding. So philosophy is just for ourselves.

(more…)

October 28 1965

Thursday, October 28th, 1965

Suzuki-roshi

Suzuki-roshi

October 28, 1965

Rev. S. Suzuki

Thursday morning lectures

In the past, in Hinayana practice in the first stage we still have consistent thinking faculties.  We do not stop our pure thinking.  This is interesting, very interesting point.

Usually we stop thinking when we sit but in the first state we can retain our thinking in sitting.  For instance when you contemplate on koan in Rinzai school they still think that thinking should be pure thinking.  Pure thinking is the characteristic of human being.  Pure thinking – no emotional faculty.  There is no emotional or sensed function.  When we see clear we know even though it is like this (draws a rectangle) it is clear for us and we know the four angles will make 360 degrees.  That kind of thinking is pure thinking.  But usually we concern if the square is right square or not.  If we think in this way, some discrimination involved in it, that is not pure thinking, which is limited in our pure human being thinking.

(more…)