Archive for August, 1971

August 1st, 1971

Sunday, August 1st, 1971

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Sunday, August 1, 1971

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-08-01

 

At the time of Yakusan—Yakusan Igen-daioshō[1]—we—every morning we recite chant names of Buddha.  Daikon Enō-daioshō.[2]   Daikon Enō is the Sixth Patriarch.  And Seigen Gyōshi—Seigen Gyōshi is the Seventh Patriarch.  And Eighth Patriarch is Sekitō Kisen.  And [the Ninth Patriarch is] Yakusan.

 

At this time, Zen Buddhism was very—became very popular or—and stronger.  Every master—there were lots of students.  But in Yakusan’s monastery there were only twenty, you know.  He—he was total [?] strict teacher.  And one day, the temple—a monk who is taking care of temple asked him to give a lecture.  “You haven’t—you haven’t given lecture for so long time, so students want to hear you.  So please give us some lecture today,” he said.[3]

 

So Yakusan asked ino-sho to hit the bell, so students came to lecture hall.  And at the third round, Yakusan appear and mounted the pulpit, and sitting for a while.  He without giving anything—saying anything, he went to his room [laughs].  [Words] taken care of [Zen master] asked him, “Why didn’t you say anything?”  Yakusan said, “Because I’m teacher who give lecture and there’s some teachers who discuss Buddhism but [words] to give lecture is not my [word].”  And his—that was his answer.  And then if he doesn’t give any lecture.  What is his purpose?   No one knows but it is difficult to figure out what was his purpose.  That there’s no reason is actually his teaching.

(more…)

August, 1971

Sunday, August 1st, 1971

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

TRANSLATION OF UNKNOWN TEXT[1]

August 1971

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-08-00

 

Assistant:[2]  … to make it record [verb].

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  Mm-hmm.

 

[Gap, scattered fragments of words and sentences.]

 

Assistant:  … like that.

 

[Gap, scattered fragments of words and sentences.]

 

Assistant:  … push it hard enough so the buttons stay down.

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  Mm-hmm.

 

[Long silent gap in tape.]

 

 

Suzuki-rōshi dictating as he translates a text:

 

“Therefore, no buddha attained enlightenment without the form of shaving head—not in the form of a shaved head.  No patriarch—no patriarch—is in the—no patriarch is not in the form of shaved head.  So the most virtuous things is the virtue of shaved head.

 

Even though you built a stūpa, which—stūpa adorned by seven jewels to reach the thirty—the thirty-third heaven, the virtue is great, but in comparison to the merit of shaved head, it is not so good as even one hundredth.  And any [1 word unclear] cannot be—cannot describe.  Stūpa could be destroyed, and once it destroyed, it—the shape cannot be—the form cannot be seen.  But merit of shaved head will increase more and more until it reach to the Buddha foot.  And its merit will not be lost.

(more…)