Posts Tagged ‘Stages’

July 11th, 1970

Saturday, July 11th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi at City Center.

Suzuki-roshi at City Center.

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No.  3: 

THE SECOND MORNING EKŌ, Part 2 of 3

Friday Evening, July 11, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-11

[This is the third in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

The Second Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka ōgu fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru

                  tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 3.  jippō jōjū no sambō, kakai muryō no kenshō,

Line 4.  jūroku dai arakan, issai no ōgu burui kenzoku ni ekō su.

Line 5.  Koinegō tokoro wa,

Line 6.  sanmyō rokutsū, mappō o shōbō ni kaeshi goriki hachige,

                  gunjō o mushō ni michibiki.

Line 7.  Sammon no nirin tsuneni tenji, kokudo no sansai nagaku shō

                  sen koto o. 

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Arhat’s Sūtra

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and respond.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra,

we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 3.  the all-pervading, ever-present Triple Treasure,

the innumerable wise men in the ocean of enlightenment,

Line 4.  the sixteen great arhats and all other arhats.

Line 5.  May it be that

Line 6.  with the Three Insights and the Six Universal Powers,

the true teaching be restored in the age of decline.

With the Five Powers and Eight Ways of Liberation,

may all sentient beings be led to nirvāna.

Line 7.  May the two wheels of this temple forever turn

and this country always avert the Three Calamities.]

 

Last night I—I explained—oh, excuse me—already about arhat.  The second sūtra—second sūtra reciting of Prajñā Pāramitā Sūtra is for arhats.  And in ekō it says:

 

[Line 1.]  Jō—Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o

                           taretamae.

[Line 2.]  Jōrai, Hannya Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru tokoro no

                           kudoku wa,

 

Some people say, Jōrai, Maka Hanyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, but some other people say, Jōrai, Hanya Shingyō—don’t—without saying Maka.  That is more usual.  Jōrai, Hanya Shingyō o fujusu.

(more…)

July 10th, 1970

Friday, July 10th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 2: 

THE SECOND MORNING EKŌ, Part 1 of 3

Friday Evening, July 10, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-10

 [This is the second in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

The Second Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka ōgu fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru

                   tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 3.  jippō jōjū no sambō, kakai muryō no kenshō,

Line 4.  jūroku dai arakan, issai no ōgu burui kenzoku ni ekō su.

Line 5.  Koinegō tokoro wa,

Line 6.  sanmyō rokutsū, mappō o shōbō ni kaeshi goriki hachige,

                   gunjō o mushō ni michibiki.

Line 7.  Sammon no nirin tsuneni tenji, kokudo no sansai nagaku shō

                   sen koto o.

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Arhat’s Sūtra[1]

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and respond.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra,

we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 3.  the all-pervading, ever-present Triple Treasure,

the innumerable wise men in the ocean of enlightenment,

Line 4.  the sixteen great arhats and all other arhats.

Line 5.  May it be that

Line 6.  with the Three Insights and the Six Universal Powers,

the true teaching be restored in the age of decline.

With the Five Powers and Eight Ways of Liberation,

may all sentient beings be led to nirvāna.

Line 7.  May the two wheels of this temple forever turn

and this country always avert the Three Calamities.]

 

[The first chanting is chanted][2]  in Buddha hall.  In China and also in Japan, we have seven important buildings.  One is sammon.[3]  Sammon is main gate.

 

And the first building you see in front of sammon is Buddha hall [butsuden].  When—here we have the first chanting.  Usually those—this Buddha hall is the building where we celebrate for our nation or for our president or emperor—something which is related to the country.  That is the most official—the building where the most official ceremonies are held.

 

And behind the butsuden—Buddha hall—we have hattō, where we give lecture or where we observe memorial service—services for members—where we recite sūtras.  This is so-called-it hattō.  Hattō means “hall of—dharma hall,” the place where we spread dharma.

(more…)

August 2nd, 1967

Wednesday, August 2nd, 1967

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

August 20, 1967 (evening)

Zen Mountain Center

Edited by Brian Fikes

[The first part of this lecture was not recorded.  Suzuki-rōshi was talking about the four stages of belief, intellectual understanding, practice, and enlightenment.  This transcript begins somewhere in the third stage.]

… when you have a new experience, at first you may form a greater belief. And you may even cry over this new experience because it is so different from the experiences you have had, and because it is too real to you. That is because your practice is still lacking. In other words, you have to practice until you become accustomed to new experiences and can digest them and act properly according to them. This kind of understanding is necessary.

Before you become afraid of it or before you wonder what it is, you should practice more under the new experience, following the new ex­perience. This is also very important. If you see your teacher when you have a new experience, he will say to practice more with the new under­standing. I don’t think all of you will always be able to practice our way with a teacher. Some of you will have to go to your own home and practice alone. In such a case, when you have a new experience, you should continue your practice following the new experience within yourself, and act bravely according to it. This kind of make-shift will be necessary for you. We should never be bound by the same old way. We should always be ready for new experiences. You may say it is kensho, but whatever you say, it is quite a new experience, both intellectually and emotionally.

(more…)