Posts Tagged ‘Non-duality’

July 22nd, 1971

Thursday, July 22nd, 1971

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

SAN-PACHI-NENJU

Thursday, July 22, 1971

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-07-22

 

This evening I want to explain about san-pachi-nenju[1]  which we practice.  Can you hear me?

 

Student:  No.

 

Suzuki-roshi:  No.  Okay.  [Laughs, laughter.]  San-pachi.  San-pachi-nenju  which we practiced this evening.  Some of you must have joined the ceremony, and some of you must have seen it.  But before I explain about san-pachi-nenju, I want to explain our—what is our practice and what will be each one of yours practice—practice of each one of you should be or will be.

 

Before everyone—before we become Buddhist, you are lay Buddhist.  And before you become lay Buddhist, you are laymen which does not belong to—member of Buddhists.  Now can you hear me?  Member of Buddhist.  So [there are] non-Buddhist people and Buddhists.  And Buddhist can be classified in four:  lay Buddhist—lay Buddhist man and lay Buddhist woman and maybe layman and laywoman, and nun, and priest.  Those are five class—classes of Buddhist group.  Four—we have four groups.

 

And each layman accept Buddhists precepts.  If usual person accepts precepts, we become Buddhist.  And I have been explaining what is precepts.  So tonight I will not speak—talk about it; but if you become Buddhist, what kind of practice you will have is next thing—is the thing I want to talk [about]—to study.

(more…)

February 25th, 1970

Wednesday, February 25th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Sesshin Lecture No. 3:

NON-DUALISTIC PRACTICE

Wednesday, February 25, 1970

San Francisco

 Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-02-25

 

Yesterday I talked about how to, maybe—two ways of practice:  one is zazen practice under the guidance of the right teacher, and the other is how to extend our practice in our everyday life.  And the—it—our teaching mostly—especially Mahāyāna Buddhist teachings—mostly directed how to extend our practice to our everyday practice.

 

The teaching of emptiness or teaching of interdependency—those teaching are to explain how, you know, from our practice which is non-dualistic—to be extended dualistic everyday life.  And that was what I told you last—yesterday.

 

So in our practice, you know, our practice is not the practice to attain something, you know, but to start our practice from the beginning, jump—jumping into the non-dualistic pure practice.  That is our practice.  [Sounds like tape was stopped here and then started again.]  Without, you know, realizing there is nothing to depend on and even ourselves—our physical body is transient, so we cannot depend upon ourselves physically and mentally.

 

And things exist looks like permanent, but it is not so.  It looks like existent, but it is nonexistent, and that is true.  With this understanding, we devote ourselves completely in our practice.  That is our practice.  Then your question may be what kind of effort, you know, you should make to practice that kind of practice of non-attainment [laughs].  That will be, you know, your, you know, question.

(more…)

July 1965

Thursday, July 1st, 1965

MODEL SUBJECT NO. 86

FROM THE HEKIGAN ROKU

“UMMON’S ‘STORE-ROOM AND TEMPLE GATE‘”

Translation and Commentary by Master Shunryū Suzuki

Roku:

Ummon Bun’en (?-949) was a disciple of Seppō and founder of the Ummon School, one of five schools of Chinese Zen Buddhism (Rinzai, Igyō, Ummon, Hōgen, and Sōtō).

During the political confusion at the end of the Tang Dynasty all the major schools of Chinese Buddhism (Tendai, Hosso, Ritsu, and Shingon) were in decline, except Zen, which was strengthened by the persecutions and the difficulty in traveling to escape persecution and to visit various Zen masters.  The hard practice of Seppō and Ummon during that time has been and still is a good example for all Zen students.

Introductory Word:

Introducing, Engo said:  To control the world without omitting a single feather, to stop all the streams of passion without losing a single drop, this is the great teacher’s activity.  If you open your mouth (in a dualistic sense) in his presence, you will fall in error.  Hesitate and you will be lost.  Who has eyes to penetrate barriers of this kind?  Ponder the following.

(more…)

April 1965

Thursday, April 1st, 1965

SRC0076

MODEL SUBJECT NO. 84

FROM THE BLUE CLIFF RECORDS

YUIMA’S “THE LAW GATE TO THE ONE AND ONLY”

The Hekigan Roku, translated into English by R.D.M. Shaw under the title of the Blue Cliff Records,[1] is a famous collection of 100 kōan stories compiled by Setchō Juken (A.D. 980–1052), who added an “Appreciatory Word” to each one.  A later Zen Master, Engo Kokugon (A.D. 1063–1135) added his “Introductory Word” as a kind of Preface to each Main Subject.  The following is a translation and commentary of Main Subject No. 84 by Reverend Suzuki.

YUIMA’S “THE DOCTRINE OF ATTAINING NON-DUALITY”

This Model Subject is about the Yuima-gyō (the Vimalakīrti-nirdesha Sūtra). This sūtra is as famous as the Shoman-gyō (the Srimala-simhanada Sūtra). Both sūtras relate stories reputed to have taken place during the time of Shākyamuni Buddha, and both have great Mahāyānistic spirit. The hero of the Yuima-gyō, Yuima, was a koji (a householder or lay Buddhist), while the heroine of the Shoman-gyō was a daughter of King Hashinoku (Prasenajit) and empress of a king in a neighboring country. She became an adherent of Buddhism and received juki (recognition as one who will achieve Buddhahood), and gave her people a sermon about Mahāyāna Buddhism in the presence of Buddha.

(more…)

February 1965

Monday, February 1st, 1965

MODEL SUBJECT NO. 82

FROM THE BLUE CLIFF RECORDS

DAIRYŪ’S IMMUTABLE LAW-BODY

Translation and Commentary by Reverend Suzuki

Introductory Word:

Introducing, Engo said:  Only a man with open eyes knows the catgut line of the fishing rod.  Only an advanced mind catches the true idea of the extraordinary procedure.  What is the catgut line of the fishing rod and the extraordinary procedure?

Main Subject:

Attention!  A monk asked Dairyū, “The physical body is disintegrating, but what about the immutable spiritual body?”

Note:

As you may see, this monk is apparently asking a question based on a dualistic idea: an immutable spiritual body and as a disintegrating physical body. However, not speaking of Zen experience or pure Enlightenment, according to the Buddhist philosophical canon: every existence has the same essential nature which is spiritual and physical, permanent and impermanent.

(more…)