Posts Tagged ‘Non-attachment’

July 4th, 1970

Saturday, July 4th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi and Katagiri-roshi at a Precepts Ceremony at City Center

Suzuki-roshi and Katagiri-roshi at a Precepts Ceremony at City Center

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

SANDŌKAI  LECTURE XII:  “It Is Not Always So”

Saturday, July 4, 1970

Tassajara

 Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-04

[This lecture is concerned with the following lines of the Sandōkai:

 

          Koto wo uke te wa subekaraku shū wo esu beshi.

          Mizukara kiku wo rissuru koto nakare.

          Sokumoku dō wo ese zumba,

          ashi wo hakobu mo izukunzo michi wo shiran.

(Transliteration by Kazuaki Tanahashi.)

 

If you listen to the words, you should understand the source of
the teaching.

Don’t establish your own rules.

If you don’t practice in your everyday life as you walk,

how can you know the way?

(Translation by Suzuki-rōshi.)]

 

 

Tonight and tonight lecture and one more lecture will be the last concluding lecture for Sandōkai.

 

And here it says Koto wo uke te wa subekaraku shū wo esu beshi.  Koto means “the first character.”  We read from this side, you know:  Koto wo—  Koto?  Koto wo uke te waKoto means “words.”  Uke te wa:  “to receive” or “to listen to”; “to receive,” you know.  This is something like “hand,” you know.  The same type [?] character—”to receive.”  If you receive words, it means that if you receive teaching, you should—subekaraku—you should—subekaraku—shouldyou should.

 

Shū wo—shū is “source of the teaching”—shū—source of the teaching which is beyond our words.  Esu beshi is “to have actual understanding of it.”  So if you listen to the words, you should understand—e—understand— shū—source of the teaching.  Usually we, you know, stick to words, and it is difficult, because we stick to words, it is difficult to see the true meaning of the teaching.  So we say, “words or teaching is finger pointing at the moon.”  If you stick to the finger pointing at the moon, you cannot see the moon.  So words is justto suggest the real meaning of the truth is the words.  So we shouldn’t stick to words, but we should know actually what the words mean.

 

At his time, you know, at Sekitō’s time, many people stick to wordsor each one’s, each Zen masters [taught] personal characteristic of Zen.  Each masters had, at that time, their own way of introducing the real teaching to the disciples.  And they stick to some special teacherssome particular way, so Zen was divided in many schools, and it was very hard to the student [to know], “Which is the true way?”  And actually, to wonder which is the true way is already, you know, wrong.  Each was, you know   Each teachers is suggesting the true teaching by his own way, so each teachers, you know, true  Each teachers is suggesting same truthsame source of the teaching which was transmitted from Buddha.  Without knowing the source of the teaching, to stick to words was wrong, and actually that was what the teachers at his [Sekitō’s] time was doing, or students’ way of studying Zen.

(more…)

December 1963

Sunday, December 1st, 1963

src0042

MODEL SUBJECT NO. 40

FROM THE HEKIGAN ROKU

(BLUE CLIFF RECORDS):

RIKKO’S “HEAVEN AND EARTH ARE THE SAME ESSENCE”

December 1963

Rikko is said to have lived from 764-834.  He was a high official of the Tang government in china. He was a disciple of Nansen Fugan.  His writings and biography are in Koji-buntoruko.  There were many famous lay Zen Buddhists during the Tang Dynasty.  The most famous of these lay Buddhists are:

Ho-Koji (Ho-un)–see Model Subject No. 42

Kak Rakten (Hak-Kyoi)–the most famous writer and poet of the Tang Dynasty.

Haikyu–Highest public official of the time. His teacher was Obaku (Huang Po).

Haykyu–Compiler of Obaku’s Denshin Hoyo (a collection of sermons and dialogues).

Riko–a high official and the scholar-author of Fukuseisho

Sai Gun–a high official and scholar

Chinso–see Model Subject No. 33

(more…)

November, 1963

Friday, November 1st, 1963

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

MAIN SUBJECT NO. 36

FROM THE BLUE CLIFF RECORDS

Cho-sha’s “Strolling about Mountains and Waters”

November 1963

Attention! One day Cho-sha went for a walk.  When he returned to the gate, the gate-keeper asked, “Sir, where have you been walking?”  Cho-sha said, “I have been strolling about in the hills.”  “Where did you go?” asked the gatekeeper. “I have walked through the scent of herbs and wandered by the falling flowers.” said Cho-sha.  The gatekeeper said, “Very much like a calm Spring feeling.”  Cho-sha said, “It transcends even the cold autumn dew falling on the lotus stems.”

Setcho, the compiler of the Blue Cliff Records, adds the comment, “I am grateful for Cho-sha’s answer.”

Commentary by Reverend Shunryū Suzuki, Master of Zen Center:

“Strolling about mountains and waters” means in Zen the stage where there are no Buddhas or Patriarchs to follow and no evil desires to stop. Not only climbing up a mountain or wandering about waters, but all activities of Cho-sha are free from rational prejudices and emotional restrictions. His mental activity is free from any trace of previous activity. His thinking is always clear without the shadows of good and evil desires.

(more…)

July 1963

Monday, July 1st, 1963

BLUE CLIFF RECORDS

MODEL SUBJECT NO. 25

TRANSLATION AND COMMENTARY BY REV. SUZUKI

ZEN MASTER OF ZEN CENTER

July 1963

Introductory Word:

Engo introducing the subject said, “If a man comes to a standstill at some stage, feeling spiritual pride in his enlightenment; he will find himself in a sea of poison. If he finds his words unable to astonish men of lofty spirit, then what he says is quite pointless.

If one can discern the relative and the absolute in the spark of a flint stone, and can apply the positive and negative way in right order, then one is said to have acquired the stage that is as stable as fathomless cliffs.

Main Subject:

Attention! The hermit of Lotus Peak took up his staff and said to the crowds, “Look at my old staff, What was the intention of the Patriarchs of former days in using their staffs?”

Since the crowds had no answer, he himself answered, “They did not have to depend on their staffs.”

Then asking them what the supreme goal was, he answered for them again, “Carrying my palm-staff on my shoulder, without any compassion, I immediately enter the thousand, ten thousand peaks of the mountains.”

(more…)