Posts Tagged ‘Just say “Hai!”’

June 5th, 1971

Saturday, June 5th, 1971
Setting up for zazen at Sokoji

Setting up for zazen at Sokoji

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

SESSHIN LECTURE NO. 1

Saturday, June 5, 1971

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-06-05

 

First of all, I want to explain, you know, I want you to understand what is our practice.  You know, our practice we say, “just to sit.”  It is, you know, “just to sit,” but I want to try to explain as much as possible what do we mean by “just to sit.”  Practice is usually, you know, practice to expect something:  at least, if you practice, you know, some way, some practice, your practice will be improve.  And if there is a goal of practice, you know, or if you practice aiming at something, you know, you will—your practice supposed to reach, you know, eventually, the goal of practice you expect.  And actually, you know, if you practice, your practice itself will be improved day by day, you know.

 

That is very true, you know, but there is another, you know, one more, you know, understanding of practice, you know, like, you know, our practice is, you know, another understanding of practice.  We practice it—our zazen—with two, with different, you know, understanding from this.  But we cannot ignore the—our imp- [partial word]—progress in our practice.  Actually, if you practice, you know, day by day, you make big progress.  And actually it will help, you know, your practice will help your health and your mental condition, you know.  That is very true.

 

But that is not, you know, full understanding of practice.  Another understanding of practice is, you know, when you practice, you know, there there is—goal is there, you know, not, you know, one year or two years later.  But when you do it right there, there is goal of practice.  When you practice our way with this understanding, there is many things you must take care of so that you could be or you will be—you can—you will be concentrated on your practice.  You will be completely involved in the practice you have right now.  That is why you have various instruction, you know, about your practice, so that you can practice hard enough to feel, you know, the goal of practice right now, when you do it.

(more…)

April 28th, 1970

Tuesday, April 28th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi

Suzuki-roshi

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

HOW TO HAVE SINCERE PRACTICE

Tuesday, April 28, 1970

San Francisco

 Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-04-28

 

Since Tatsugami-rōshi[1]  came, you must have heard Dōgen-zenji’s name so many times.  But Dōgen-zenji may not like to hear his name so many times [laughs].  But unfortunately he had a name like Dōgen, so [laughs] there is no other way to address him.  So we call him Dōgen-zenji or Dōgen.

 

As you know, he didn’t like to say “Zen” even, or Zen—in China they called monks who sit in zazen, called [them] “Zen monks,” but he didn’t like to call “Zen” even.  And he said if necessary you should call us “Buddha’s disciple.”  Shamon, you know, he called himself Shamon Dōgen—”A Monk Dōgen.”

 

In China, there were many various schools like Rinzai, Sōtō, Ummon, Hōgen, Igyō.  But Nyojō-zenji’s—Nyojō-zenji,[2]  who was Dōgen’s teacher then, was not, according to Dōgen, [from] one of the five schools of Zen or seven[3]  schools of Zen.  His Zen is just to practice zazen, to realize—to actually realize by his body Buddha’s mind, Buddha’s spirit.  That was his Zen.  That was why Dōgen accepted him as his teacher.

 

Before he—Dōgen went to China, he studied Hiezan [Onjō-ji?]—Tendai—main temple of Tendai school.  And after Tendai, he went to Eisei—Eisai-zenji[4]—Yoshin-ji [Kennin-ji?], and then he went to China because Eisai-zenji passed away when he was very young.  So he went to China to continue his practice with good teacher.

(more…)