Posts Tagged ‘Communication’

August 8th, 1971

Sunday, August 8th, 1971
Suzuki-roshi and Okusan

Suzuki-roshi and Okusan

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Sunday, August 8, 1971

Zen Mountain Center

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-08-07

(The interchange with the last questioner is not included in the audio file)

 

Tonight I have nothing to talk about [laughs].  Empty hand.  No book.  I just appeared here [laughter].  But as Yakusan-zenji[1]  did, I wouldn’t go back to my room without saying anything.  If you ask some questions, I will answer.  In that way, I want to spend just one hour with you.  Okay?   If you have some questions, please ask me.  Ask.  Okay.  Hai.

 

Student A:  Rōshi, I notice that often when I wake up in the morning the first minute or so my mind is sort of unclear.  [Remaining 3-6 sentences unclear.]

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  It is because you are [at] Tassajara pretty long time, and you have not much problem to follow our schedule.  So you have, maybe—you have time to think [about] something else, you know [laughs].  That is, maybe, the reason.  At first, as we—as it is difficult to follow our schedule and to know exactly what we do in zendō.  First of all you think about [how?] to go to zendō anyway, you know.  That will be the first thing you think about.  But more and more, you feel as if you can do pretty well.  I think that is main reason.  I think that is not so good, but that is—anyway that will be the problem for the student who stay pretty long time here.  So if it is so, I must give you a big slap [laughs], but now I—I want to ask you—I have a question, you know.  Why do I give you a slap—because your practice is not so good?  [Taps stick several times.]  What will be the reason for—reason of the slap?

 

Student A:  It seems [1-2 words] to my mind, to—to wake me up right now.

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  Mm-hmm.

 

Student A:  And I [4-8 words].

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  Mm-hmm.  When you just wake up, you know, you have—you don’t have, you know, so many things in your mind.  Your mind is clear.  And when your mind is clear, you have to come to zendō.  And our practice should be continuous view [?] of practice, but that is actually not so easy.  So—but if—if something appears already, it can’t be helped, you know.  You shouldn’t fight with it.  Even so, even [if] you have problem, [and] your mind is not clear, you should come.  That is what you should do.  To encourage that kind of practice, I give you slap or dōan or ino will, if you are still in bed, you know, for an instance.  Someone will go to—to bring you to the zendō.

(more…)

August 7th, 1971

Saturday, August 7th, 1971

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Saturday Evening, August 7, 1971

Zen Mountain Center

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-08-07 Part 1

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 71-08-07 Part 2

I want to discuss with you about, you know, how you study Zen.  Zen is actually, in short, maybe, communication—communication—communication between your friend, and communication between your teacher and disciple—

 

Can you hear me?  Oh.

 

—communication between teacher and disciple, and communication between we human being and our surrounding—communication between man and nature.  This is, in short, Zen.  To have perfect communication—wherever you are—to have perfect communication and you and the outside world.

 

Communication—if we say “communication,” it looks like there is subject and object, but true—if you understand real relationship between each existence, it is originally one, and tentatively we understand in two ways—two duality—dualistic way, so it is quite natural for us to have perfect communication between each being, and why it is difficult to communicate with each other is because our mind is always in duality.

 

That is why it is difficult to communicate.  So perfect communication—there is actually nothing to say, even, and when there is nothing to say, that is zazen practice [laughs].  You don’t have to say anything when you sit.  And yet you have perfect communication with everything.  So when you understand—if you want to study Zen, first of all you should know how to study Zen.  How to study Zen is to—to be acquainted always, you know, to your surroundings, and that is how you have, for an instance, dokusan with your teacher.  Perhaps when you come to dokusan you feel as if you want—you must have some question to ask [laughs], you know, but it is not necessary so.  It is not always so.  When you are very attentive, then even though you have no question to ask, if you enter the room and see your teacher, then—and you should be very alert—alert enough to see what is the mood of the teacher today [laughs].  Is he happy or unhappy [laughs], you know, is—is—is he busy or not so busy, or is he ready to accept you or not?  You should be very attentive.  And that is how you practice Zen.

(more…)