Archive for July, 1970

July 31st, 1970

Friday, July 31st, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

SESSHIN MEETING

Friday, July 31, 1970

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-31

 

… [laughter].  What he—she meant is if you stand up, you know, with painful legs or sleeping legs, you will [laughs]—it will be dan- [partial word]—dangerous [laughs, laughter].  That is why she said so—so, you know.  I think that is very important, you know, and even though you feel your legs, okay.  But it is better to make it—make them sure [laughs], rubbing, you know, your knee.

 

Student A:  I thought what she was saying was that once we stood up, we were supposed to stand there without—before we started walking.

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  Excuse me, I don’t—

 

Student A:  I thought that, you know—

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  —I don’t know what she said, you know, so it is difficult [laughter].

 

Student A:  I just won’t move [laughing] until the person in front of me leaves.

 

Suzuki-rōshi:  When you make kinhin, you know, walk, you know, so that you give them—  You know, if you walk too slowly or if you have too much, you know, distance, between you and someone ahead of you, that will make other person difficult to walk, so you should be careful, you know, abo- [partial word]—about distance between you and a person ahead of you.  So keep certain, you know, distance.  And if, you know, someone like me, you know, walk—naturally I walk slowly, you know.  That will give others some difficulties.  And as I walk very slowly, we—I will have big distance from [laughs] a person who is walking ahead of me.

(more…)

July 28th, 1970

Tuesday, July 28th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi with ??

Suzuki-roshi with ??

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

HOW TO UNDERSTAND RITUALS AND PRECEPTS: 

ZAZEN, RITUALS AND PRECEPTS CANNOT BE SEPARATED

Sunday Evening, July 28, 1970

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-28

 

This evening I want to talk about some problems you have when you come to Zen Center.  And you understand why we practice—zazen practice, pretty well.  But why we observe this kind of ritual—rituals, is maybe rather difficult to understand why.  Actually, it is not something to be explained [laughs] so well.  If you ask me why we observe or why I observe those rituals, you know, without much problem is difficult to answer.

 

But first of all, why I do it is because—because I have been doing for a long time [laughs].  So for me there is not much problem [laughs, laughter].  So I—I tend to think that because I have no problem in observing my way, there must not be problem—so much problem for you [laughs].  But actually, you are an Amer- [partial word]—you are Americans, and I am Japanese, and you have been—you were not practicing Bud- [partial word]—Buddhist way, so there must be various problems [laughs].

 

So this kind of problem is almost impossible to solve.  But if you, you know, actually follow our way I think you will reach—you will have some understanding of our rituals.  And what I want to talk about is actually about precepts, you know.

(more…)

July 26th, 1970

Sunday, July 26th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

MUDRĀ PRACTICE AND HOW TO ACCEPT INSTRUCTIONS FROM VARIOUS TEACHERS

Sunday Morning, July 26, 1970

San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-26 

 

This morning, I want to talk about our practice, as usual [laughs],  as—especially when we have various teachers.  So far we had Tatsugami-rōshi[1] and Yoshida-rōshi.[2]  And you will be—you will have—your practice must be confused a little bit [laughs], this way or that way [laughs].  But actually for you there is only one practice.  There is no need to be confused when you have right understanding of our practice of Dōgen-zenji.  But I don’t say Dōgen-zenji’s way, this way, or that way.

 

For advanced students, what I want to talk about will be easily understood.  You know, for an instance, when you, you know—about mudrā you have in your zazen.  Keizan-zenji,[3] you know, says:  “Put your mind on your mudrā, or in your palm.”  And some teacher—Yoshida-rōshi says—say:  “Put your thumb on your middle finger, like—over your middle finger.”  Some other teacher says, you know,” put your thumb—have a vertical line by [between] your pointing finger and thumb, like this [presumably gestures].

 

Recently what—I notice that some—some of you [laughs] [were] doing this too much this way.  Someone’s finger—finger—thumb is not right over middle finger, you know.  Maybe [laughs] like this.  Going the extreme, you know, like this.  That is not what Yoshida-rōshi said.

This is too much.

(more…)

July 19th, 1970

Sunday, July 19th, 1970
This may be lunch at Sokoji

This may be lunch at Sokoji

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

JAPANESE WAY, AMERICAN WAY, BUDDHIST WAY

Sunday, July 19, 1970

City Center, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-19

 

After—after forty days of my leaving from here I feel I am a stranger to the building, not to you but [laughs] to the building and my cups and [laughs, laughter].  I forgot where is my—where was my things.  Each time I need something, I have to try to think about “Where is it?  Oh!  There.”  [Laughs.]  Something like that.

 

I am thinking about now, at the same, time Dōgen-zenji’s teaching:   “There are people who is in enlightenment over enlightenment and delusion in delusion.”  You know, enlightenment over enlightenment [laughs].  It does not mean after attaining enlightenment he lost himself, and he—that he became a hermit or something.

 

“Enlightenment over en- [partial word]—over enlightenment” may be too much enlightenment [laughs, laughter] for you.  But “enlightenment over enlightenment”—maybe tr- [partial word]—my translation is wrong, but I don’t know how to translate it.

 

“Enlightenment over enlightenment” means to forget enlightenment after attaining enlightenment.  Such people, you know, because they have no idea of enlightenment anymore because they already have gone through enlightenment, so there is no trace of enlightenment in their mind.  So they have, you know, they do not stick to enlightenment anymore.  They do not stick to Buddhist way anymore.  So they are quite common.  And you—common enough—to be a ordinary person.

(more…)

July 15th, 1970

Wednesday, July 15th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 6:  THE FOURTH MORNING EKŌ

Wednesday, July 15, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-15

 

[This is the last in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

The Fourth Morning Ekō:

Chōka shidō[1] fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa sambō, fushite shōkan o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Dai hi shin darani o fujusu,

Line 3.  atsumuru tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 4.  tōzan bōsō hokkai bōsōgya tō kakkaku honi,

Line 5.  kokka kōrōsha sho shōrei,

Line 6.  tōzan kechien shidō no danna,

Line 7.  gassan seishu no roku shin kenzoku shichi se no bumo,

                  hokkaino ganjiki ni ekō su,

Line 8.  onajiku bodai o madoka ni sen koto o.

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Ancestor’s Sūtra

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and give us the true Triple

Treasure.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Dai Hi Shin Darani,

Line 3.  we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 4.  this temple’s deceased monks plus all deceased monks,

each one dignified,

Line 5.  all the souls of this nation’s actual benefactors,

Line 6.  this temple’s members and supporters,

Line 7.  this temple’s priests and monks and all their relatives for

seven generations, and all sentient beings in the realm

of the true law.

Line 8.  May they be completely enlightened.]

 

The last chanting will be the chanting for the—for monks, you know, or students who is related—who was—who passed away:  student related to the temple or monastery.  We, for an instance—last year Trudy Dixon passed away, and we had a ceremony—memorial service the other day.  But not only [on] memorial days but also we recite sūtra every morning for monks and students who passed away, and the parents or ancestors of we students, and our donors, and the people who worked for the country—for our country.  That is—is the last service we have every morning.

(more…)

July 13th, 1970

Monday, July 13th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi participating in a ceremonial procession (in Japan)

Suzuki-roshi participating in a ceremonial procession (in Japan)

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 5:  THE THIRD MORNING EKŌ

Monday, July 13, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-13

[fixed audio uploaded on 9/25/2013]

 

[This is the fifth in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

 

The Third Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka sōdō fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Sandōkai o fujusu, atsumuru tokoro no shukun wa,

Bibashi-butsu-daioshō,

Shiki-butsu-daioshō,

Bishafu-butsu-daioshō,

Kuruson-butsu-daioshō,

Kunagonmuni-butsu-daioshō,

Kashō-butsu-daioshō,

Shakamuni-butsu-daioshō,

Makakashō-daioshō

Ananda-daioshō,

Shōnawashu-daioshō,

Ubakikuta-daioshō,

Daitaka-daioshō,

Mishaka-daioshō,

Vashumitsu-daioshō,

(more…)

July 12th, 1970

Sunday, July 12th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 4: 

THE SECOND MORNING EKŌ, Part 3 of 3

Sunday, July 12, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-12

[This is the fourth in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

The Second Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka ōgu fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru

                  tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 3.  jippō jōjū no sambō, kakai muryō no kenshō,

Line 4.  jūroku dai arakan, issai no ōgu burui kenzoku ni ekō su.

Line 5.  Koinegō tokoro wa,

Line 6.  sanmyō rokutsū, mappō o shōbō ni kaeshi goriki hachige,

                  gunjō o mushō ni michibiki.

Line 7.  Sammon no nirin tsuneni tenji, kokudo no sansai nagaku shō

                  sen koto o. 

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Arhat’s Sūtra

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and respond.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra,

we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 3.  the all-pervading, ever-present Triple Treasure,

the innumerable wise men in the ocean of enlightenment,

Line 4.  the sixteen great arhats and all other arhats.

Line 5.  May it be that

Line 6.  with the Three Insights and the Six Universal Powers,

the true teaching be restored in the age of decline.

With the Five Powers and Eight Ways of Liberation,

may all sentient beings be led to nirvāna.

Line 7.  May the two wheels of this temple forever turn

and this country always avert the Three Calamities.]

 

In the second recitation of the Prajñā Pāramitā Sūtra, we dedicate for the—to the arhats and many various sages in the—in the world.  And what we pray is—what we pray is—this is the translation Mel [Weitsman] and I did.  “What we pray is that the wisdom—that the wisdom—and Three Wisdom—and the Six Unrestruct- [partial word]—Unrestricted Ways of the arhats.”

 

Three Wisdom—we explain the Three Wisdom.  “And the Six Unrestrict—[partial word]—Unrestr- [partial word]—Unrestricted Ways of the arhats may be always with us in our unceas-[partial word]—unceasing effort to renew Buddha’s way to save all sentient beings from the world of suffering and confusion.”  “World of suffering and confusion” means the mappō.  “And to keep Buddha’s way always new to our—always—our al- [partial word]—world always.”  That is the spirit of Dōgen.

(more…)

July 11th, 1970

Saturday, July 11th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi at City Center.

Suzuki-roshi at City Center.

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No.  3: 

THE SECOND MORNING EKŌ, Part 2 of 3

Friday Evening, July 11, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-11

[This is the third in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

The Second Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka ōgu fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru

                  tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 3.  jippō jōjū no sambō, kakai muryō no kenshō,

Line 4.  jūroku dai arakan, issai no ōgu burui kenzoku ni ekō su.

Line 5.  Koinegō tokoro wa,

Line 6.  sanmyō rokutsū, mappō o shōbō ni kaeshi goriki hachige,

                  gunjō o mushō ni michibiki.

Line 7.  Sammon no nirin tsuneni tenji, kokudo no sansai nagaku shō

                  sen koto o. 

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Arhat’s Sūtra

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and respond.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra,

we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 3.  the all-pervading, ever-present Triple Treasure,

the innumerable wise men in the ocean of enlightenment,

Line 4.  the sixteen great arhats and all other arhats.

Line 5.  May it be that

Line 6.  with the Three Insights and the Six Universal Powers,

the true teaching be restored in the age of decline.

With the Five Powers and Eight Ways of Liberation,

may all sentient beings be led to nirvāna.

Line 7.  May the two wheels of this temple forever turn

and this country always avert the Three Calamities.]

 

Last night I—I explained—oh, excuse me—already about arhat.  The second sūtra—second sūtra reciting of Prajñā Pāramitā Sūtra is for arhats.  And in ekō it says:

 

[Line 1.]  Jō—Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o

                           taretamae.

[Line 2.]  Jōrai, Hannya Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru tokoro no

                           kudoku wa,

 

Some people say, Jōrai, Maka Hanyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, but some other people say, Jōrai, Hanya Shingyō—don’t—without saying Maka.  That is more usual.  Jōrai, Hanya Shingyō o fujusu.

(more…)

July 10th, 1970

Friday, July 10th, 1970

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 2: 

THE SECOND MORNING EKŌ, Part 1 of 3

Friday Evening, July 10, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-10

 [This is the second in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi on

the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services at

San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

 

The Second Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka ōgu fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shōkan, fushite kannō o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō o fujusu, atsumuru

                   tokoro no kudoku wa,

Line 3.  jippō jōjū no sambō, kakai muryō no kenshō,

Line 4.  jūroku dai arakan, issai no ōgu burui kenzoku ni ekō su.

Line 5.  Koinegō tokoro wa,

Line 6.  sanmyō rokutsū, mappō o shōbō ni kaeshi goriki hachige,

                   gunjō o mushō ni michibiki.

Line 7.  Sammon no nirin tsuneni tenji, kokudo no sansai nagaku shō

                   sen koto o.

 

Dedication for the Morning Service Arhat’s Sūtra[1]

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us and respond.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra,

we dedicate the collected merit to

Line 3.  the all-pervading, ever-present Triple Treasure,

the innumerable wise men in the ocean of enlightenment,

Line 4.  the sixteen great arhats and all other arhats.

Line 5.  May it be that

Line 6.  with the Three Insights and the Six Universal Powers,

the true teaching be restored in the age of decline.

With the Five Powers and Eight Ways of Liberation,

may all sentient beings be led to nirvāna.

Line 7.  May the two wheels of this temple forever turn

and this country always avert the Three Calamities.]

 

[The first chanting is chanted][2]  in Buddha hall.  In China and also in Japan, we have seven important buildings.  One is sammon.[3]  Sammon is main gate.

 

And the first building you see in front of sammon is Buddha hall [butsuden].  When—here we have the first chanting.  Usually those—this Buddha hall is the building where we celebrate for our nation or for our president or emperor—something which is related to the country.  That is the most official—the building where the most official ceremonies are held.

 

And behind the butsuden—Buddha hall—we have hattō, where we give lecture or where we observe memorial service—services for members—where we recite sūtras.  This is so-called-it hattō.  Hattō means “hall of—dharma hall,” the place where we spread dharma.

(more…)

July 8th, 1970

Wednesday, July 8th, 1970
Suzuki-roshi in front of San Francisco Zen Center

Suzuki-roshi in front of San Francisco Zen Center

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

EKŌ LECTURES, No. 1:  THE FIRST MORNING EKŌ 

Wednesday, July 8, 1970

Tassajara

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 70-07-08

 

 

[This is the first in a series of six lectures by Suzuki-rōshi

on the four ekōs chanted at the conclusion of morning services

at San Francisco Zen Center and other Sōtō Zen temples and monasteries.

The lectures were delivered from July 8 to July 15, 1970.

The Japanese transliteration and English translation of the ekōs

are based, with minor changes, on David Chadwick’s

“Ekō Study Book:  A Tassajara Project,” December 1970

(unpublished manuscript, San Francisco Zen Center).

 

 

The First Morning Ekō:

 

Chōka butsuden fugin

 

Line 1.  Aogi koi negawakuwa shinji, fushite shōkan o taretamae.

Line 2.  Jōrai, Maka Hannyaharamita Shingyō, shōsai myō kichijō

                   darani o fujusu,

Line 3.  atsumuru tokoro no shukun wa

Line 4.  daion kyōshu honshi Shakamuni Butsu;

Line 5.  Shintan Shoso Bodai Daruma-daioshō;

Line 6.  Nichi-riki Shoso Eihei Dōgen-daioshō;

Line 7.  Daishō Monjushiri Bosatsu no tame ni shi tatematsuri.

Line 8.  Kami jion ni mukuin koto o.

 

 

Morning Service Buddha Hall Sūtra

 

Line 1.  May Buddha observe [see?] us, and may we receive his true

compassion.

Line 2.  Thus, as we chant the Maha Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra

and the Dharani for Removing Disasters,

Line 3.  we offer the collected merit to

Line 4.  the great kind founder, the original teacher, Shākyamuni

Buddha;

Line 5.  the First Patriarch of China, the great Bodhidharma;

Line 6.  the First Patriarch of Japan, the great Eihei Dōgen;

Line 7.  and the great sage Mañjushrī Bodhisattva.

Line 8.  Let us reflect their compassion and mercy.]

 

 

I want to explain ekō.[1]  The ekō is—after reciting sūtra, we—[it is] a sort of explanation of why we recite sūtra.  And this sūtra is for such-and-such buddha, or next sūtra is for arhats, or third one is for our patriarchs, and fourth one is for disciples and students who is related to this monastery and the ancestors or relative who passed away.  Those are ekō.

(more…)