Archive for June, 1967

June 22nd, 1967 2nd talk

Thursday, June 22nd, 1967

Rev S. Suzuki

June 22, 1967

Los Altos

Tonight, perhaps I was supposed to explain the chapter in the Platform Sutra of the thirty-two pairs of opposites; right and wrong, there he points out thirty-two pairs of opposites.  This is very interesting points.  Originally in this sutra, what is essence of mind is the point of the sutra, and the various pairs of opposites are the two sides of the one essence of mind.  So that is why he referred to various idea…opposites ideas.  Because of the opposite idea we have our study do not result in anything.  When your understanding is always in realm of good or bad there is no end in your study.  But when your understanding reach the point where there is no opposites, where you find oneness of the two opposites when you are in perfect renunciations.  And the characteristic of Buddhism is to attain oneness within this kind of opposite idea.  So in opposite idea we should find the oneness of the opposites.  Without rejecting bad to attain oneness is to attain the goal, is our purpose.  Usually rejecting flesh under ( ?  ) spiritual attainment, or rejecting bad nature resume good pure nature is the purpose of religious effort, but ours is quite different.  We find both good and bad in oneness.  So the essence of mind or original mind is actually something, sometime which is…which looks like good and sometime looks like bad is the original nature.  (more…)

June 22nd, 1967

Thursday, June 22nd, 1967

Kobun Chino-roshi, Suzuki-roshi, Li Gotami and Lama Anagarika Govinda

Rev S. Suzuki

June 22, 1967

I am so grateful to introduce to you Kobun Chino, sensei.  He was appointed to Zen Center to be a teacher of you.  I hadn’t met him before.  I was told about him but yesterday I met him for the first time and I felt as if we were old friends.  I was so happy to see him.  It was quite a long time since I saw you…maybe three weeks, but I feel as if it is almost one year or so but actually it is just three weeks.  In this three weeks this zendo, Haiku Zendo, made a big progress under the guidance of Katagiri, sensei.  As Dogen-zenji said, “Don’t think what you have attained will be known by you.”  Perhaps, I think, you don’t know how much progress you made, but actually it is like a plant.  If you do not see it for two or three days you will be amazed how the plant grows.  The same thing happens in our practice.  Even though we don’t know at all what we are doing…we are repeating the same thing over and over again, sometimes making mistakes, but actually by repeating same thing, without knowing what we are doing, something results.  That result…when you think or when you wonder what you have done all the merit will be vanished all at once, but when you don’t know, you have it.  (more…)

June 12th, 1967

Monday, June 12th, 1967

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

SUNDAY[1] LECTURE

Monday, June 12, 1967

Transcript Not Verbatim

From now on, on each Sunday service I want to continue the lecture about—Shi-sho-ku [?].  This is our text [by Dōgen-zenji].

We explained—we studied about already the three—the three refuges which is fundamental precepts for Buddhist and we have sixteen precepts, three refuges, triple treasures and ten commandments or ten prohibitive—prohibitive precepts.  And the three refuges and the three, the triple treasures are basic precepts.  And before we take triple treasures, we take repentance.

So repentance and triple treasures and the three corrective precepts and ten commandments.  This is our rules to take refuge or in Buddha or Dharma or Sangha.  As we briefly studied the three triple treasures, so, today we will study about the three corrective precepts.  Next—next we should accept the three corrective pure precepts: that embracing good behavior, that embracing good deeds and that embracing all being and saving them.  We should then …  we should then accept the 10 grave prohibitions.

(more…)

June 11th, 1967

Sunday, June 11th, 1967

Suzuki-roshi with students at Tassajara

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Sesshin Lecture:  THREE TREASURES

Sunday, June 11, 1967

[Rōshi seems to be commenting on Shi Sho Ku (?) of Dōgen.

When this is evident, Dōgen’s words are in quotation marks.]

Today I will explain Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha.  Originally, Buddha is, of course, the one who attained enlightenment under the Bodhi tree and became a teacher of all the teachers.  Dharma is the teaching which was told by Buddha, and Sangha is the group who studied under Buddha.  This way of understanding Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha is called the “manifested three treasures,” or as we say in Japanese, Genzen sanbōGenzen is “to appear.”  Of course, whether Buddha appeared or not, there is truth.  But if there is no one who realizes the truth, the truth means nothing to us.  So in this sense we say the manifes­ta­tion of truth:  the manifestation of truth is Sangha.

(more…)

June 1st, 1967

Thursday, June 1st, 1967

Rev S. Suzuki

June 1, 1967

Los Altos

There is big misunderstanding about the idea of naturalness.  Most people who come to us believe in some freedom or naturalness, but their understanding of naturalness is so-called heretic naturalness.  Heresy…a kind of heresy.  We call it (ji neng den getto)? In Japanese.  ( Jin eng den getto ?) means something which…some idea that there is no need to be formal or to be rigid, just a kind of ‘let-alone-policy’, or sloppiness.  That is naturalness for most people.  But that is not the naturalness we mean.  It is rather difficult to explain what it is, but naturalness is, I think, some feeling which is independent from everything.  That is naturalness.  Or some activity which is based on nothingness.  Something which comes out of nothing is naturalness.  Like a seed or plant comes out from the ground.  When you see it that is naturalness.  The seed has no idea of being some particular plant, but it has its own form and it is in perfect harmony with the ground, with the surrounding, and while it is growing, in course of time it has its…it expresses its nature.  So any plants…anything do not exist in no form or no color.  Whatever it is it has some form and color, and that form and color is in perfect harmony with other beings.  And there is no trouble.  That is so-called naturalness.

(more…)