Archive for August, 1966

August 19, 1966 3rd Talk

Friday, August 19th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Friday, August 19, 1966

SESSHIN LECTURE:  Friday Evening

Lecture D

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-19 3rd talk

Suzuki-rōshi: We have already a pretty good understanding of our practice because we have studied it from various side.  Here is the interesting subject.  I think you—you can easily understand this subject.[1]

main subject

Attention!  A monk asked Jōshū:  “All the dharma lead up to the one, but what does the one lead up to?”

Jōshū said, “I was in the Province of Sei.  I made a hempen robe.  It weighed seven pounds.”

This is very famous story.

Attention!  A monk asked Jōshū:  “All the dharmas, all the teachings, all the dharmas lead up to the one.  What does the one lead up to?”

Jōshū said, “I was—I have been in Province of Sei.  I made a hempen robe.  It weighed seven pounds.”

That was answer.

Jōshū is the famous Chinese Zen master who joined our order at his age of sixty.[2] And he studied zazen, our practice, for twenty years under Nansen.[3] And he became a temple [?] monk [?] and—until he died at the age of one hundred and twenty [laughs, laughter].  It is not joke [laughs].  It is true—historical—it is true.  And he—his way is so simple, and his life is so bare—bare, you know—bare enough to—just to support himself.  He always sit in broken chair, and one of the four legs of the chair, his chair, was always mended [laughs] by—by a rope.  Anyway, he is, you know, unique, powerful Zen master.

(more…)

August 19, 1966 2nd Talk

Friday, August 19th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Friday, August 19, 1966

SESSHIN LECTURE:  Friday Morning during Zazen

Lecture B

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Tape operator: This lecture is Friday morning during zazen, and it begins “We have one more day.”

Suzuki-rōshi: Don’t be attached to your attainment as a result of—as a result of past effort.  Or don’t be attached to the refreshed stage you attained mechanically.  Open up your mind wider and more—be more subtle, ready to accept things as it is, and practice—continue your practice.  This is the meaning of sesshin.  The mind you attained is not even quite newly refreshed mind.  It is nothing itself—itself, free from all attachment.

I am very much grateful to sit with you in this way and to have more chance to sit.  Let’s make this sesshin more meaningful one. (more…)

August 19, 1966

Friday, August 19th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Friday, August 19, 1966

SESSHIN LECTURE:  Friday Morning

Lecture A

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-19

Audio of Suzuki-roshi 66-08-19 continued (remainder of talk)

I think you must have tired out [laughing], but not yet.  I know you are not tired out yet.  Don’t give up before you [are] actually tired.  It is not so easy to be tired out.  It is pretty difficult.  Before you get tired out, it takes many and many years [laughter].  Don’t worry.

You know, the Sixth—Sixth Patriarch—this Zen master[1] is the direct disciple of the Sixth Patriarch and who was very famous, but unfortunately he had not good disciple.  But he became a teacher of the emperor.  The emperor used to drive his cart when he was coming.[2] He was so learned and so virtuous person.

And I finished—I stopped his answer in halfway.[3] So it may be better to start it from the beginning of his answer to the question given by the—given by a southern—southern—a monk who was born in southern country.

(more…)

August 18, 1966

Thursday, August 18th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Thursday, August 18, 1966

SESSHIN LECTURE:  Thursday, 1:00 pm

Lecture B

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-18

Before translating original text,[1] I want to make sure the understanding of—our traditional way of understanding of teaching or our understanding of practice.  As being goes on and on from formed to forming,[2] our teaching develops on and on.  It—it is new expression of old teaching in one way, and—but on the other hand it is returning to the old teaching.  Actually it is the same thing.  To—from Buddha to us and to—from us to Buddha, it is same thing.  It is same understanding, but when we bow to him it means teaching comes from Buddha.  But the teaching comes from Buddha to us means actually your experience—new experience of Buddha—return to Buddha.  So it is same thing, but the understanding is different.  When we say something about our teaching, there is no other way to say teaching comes from Buddha, or our teaching should go back to Buddha.  That is our effort of developing Buddhism.  We should not be just confined in the realm of Buddha’s teaching.  Always new expression is necessary, but new experience is actually going back to Buddha.

(more…)

August 16 & 17, 1966

Tuesday, August 16th, 1966

Suzuki-roshi and Yvonne Rand, dokusan room at City Center

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

Sesshin:  Lunch Lecture

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Zazen doesn’t follow [1-3 words unclear].

Our mind should—should not be stagnated or in agitation.  Our mind should be calm.  And to be calm does not mean to be stagnant.

So put your head [1-2 word] more straight and up—topright [?].  In this case, don’t pull [?] your chin.

Then your state of mind will change.

(more…)

August 15th, 1966, 3rd Talk

Monday, August 15th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Monday, August 15, 1966

Sesshin:  Monday Evening Lecture

Lecture D

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-15 3rd Talk

The first day of the sesshin is almost finished.  In the first day, I wanted you to establish a good posture.  It is rather—it was not appropriate to give you some—something to work on intellectually, but as you have been physically worked so hard, so for a change I will give you some intellectual problems in Buddhism.

We are now coping with the problem of causality.  This—I think Reverend Katagiri must have told you something about this, I think.  But this problem is very big problem—so big that it covers all the area of Buddhist philosophy.  The one of the philosophy which suggest us right understanding of causation is Kegon Sūtra.  In Kegon, we have a famous statement in Japanese:  Ichi soku issai, issai soku ichi.[1] “Things are—things are one of many—things exist one of many, or many of one—as one of many, or many of one.”  The one—the understanding of “one of many” is rather mechanical understanding of existence.  And “many of one,” understanding of many—existent as many of one is teleological understanding of existence.[2] But both understanding will reduce to the one understanding which is eternal present.

(more…)

August 15, 1966 2nd Talk

Monday, August 15th, 1966

Suzuki-roshi monitoring zazen (in Japan)

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Monday, August 15, 1966

August Sesshin:  Lunch Lecture

Lecture B

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-15 2nd Talk

[2-3 words] those who cannot appreciate the—the food we are serving [?] to you cannot appreciate our teaching in its true sense.  When you listen to the teaching—our teaching, we should accept it, but if you have some prejudice, you cannot accept the teaching.  Those [?] do not appreciate—appreciate [?] in its true sense, meaning [?] we should not have any discrimination with our food.  This is good test for ourselves.  The food you have now will not be complete for you.  Something will be quite strange or unfamiliar to find [?].  We should appreciate the food you have on each meal.

(more…)

August 15, 1966

Monday, August 15th, 1966

Shunryū Suzuki-rōshi

Monday, August 15, 1966

August Sesshin Lecture

Soko-ji Temple, San Francisco

Lecture A

Listen to this talk: Suzuki-roshi 66-08-15 1st Talk

Suzuki-rōshi: The second paragraph [of the Genjō Kōan]:

That we move ourselves and understand all things is ignorance.  That things advance and understand themselves is enlightenment.  It is Buddha who understand ignorance.  It is people who are ignorant of ignor- [partial word]—enlightenment.  Further, there are those who are enlightened about enlightenment, and those who are ignorant of ignorance. [Recording stops.][1]

Tape operator: Uh, what would you like me to say into the microphone?  [Recording stops.]

Suzuki-rōshi: … trace of enlightenment—enlightenment—  … trace of enlightenment—enlightenment—  [Fragments only.]

[2]… among many instructions about how to sit:  to keep your back straight, pull your chin, and about mudrā in your hand.  The most important thing is, we say, to stop thinking or to keep your mind on your breathing.  Dōgen-zenji says, “Think non-thinking.  Think non-thinking.”  This is a very important point, and at the same time this is very difficult practice because your mind will be easily carried away.  Sometime I—when you feel very good, but as soon as you feel you reached a certain stage, your mind will be carried away because you felt something [laughs], and your mind is not on your breathing any more [laughs].  So if you want to concentrated on your breathing, you should not mind even the state of mind you are in your practice.

(more…)